Bosendorfer’s Special Keys

WHY THE EXTRA SPECIAL KEYS?

People often ask, “Why does the Bosendorfer Imperial Grand have 97, as opposed to 88, keys?” It started back in 1909 when Bosendorfer responded to the request of composer Ferruccio Busoni. He wanted a piano with an extra octave in the bass  register to accommodate his piano transcriptions of some of J. S. Bach’s organ works. The works were originally written for the pipe organ, and the extra notes represented the 32’ bass pipes on the organ. Later on, Bartok, Debussy and Ravel also wrote compositions which required the extra keys, all located on the bass end of the keyboard.

While these extra keys are seldom directly played in modern music, they still resonate when the other strings are struck. This additional resonance contributes to a richer, fuller sound on the instrument. The proof is in your ears! One can imagine that they hear chimes when a Bosendorfer is being played. Listen and judge for yourself! The Bosendorfer is truly something special.

Check Out the Birth of a Bosendorfer Opus 50.000!

Take a look at our Bosendorfer Imperial Piano  

9’6″ in length with 97 Special Keys

Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano with 97 Special Keys

Here is an in depth look at the Extra Special Keys

Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano with 97 Special Keys